Another kids book by @DanaMLewis – this time about celiac disease

When I wrote my first book for kids about diabetes devices, I had an idea that I might write more kids books for my nieces and nephews. While my first book was inspired by a verbatim conversation with my niece, my next book is inspired instead by a cute story of my nephews, combined with a burst of frustration about living with celiac.

This new book, “Parker’s Peanut Butter”, wrote itself in my head while I was on a trip in Germany. The hotel I was staying at, despite many early communications about needing safe, gluten-free food, did not get gluten free at all. Being told “this dish is ‘usually’ gluten free” was incredibly frustrating. That night, I began drafting this story to help explain celiac – and cross-contamination – to kids.

The next day, with the book top of mind, I was at a meeting where artists had been hired to help document and crystallize some of what was happening at the meeting. I had seen some live illustrators before document various sessions at conferences, but these two artists were in a class of their own. They did such an amazing job capturing the key themes, quotes, and their illustrations were simple yet effective – and incredibly quick on the spot. I was in awe. I had an idea that wow, if someone like them would illustrate my next book, it would probably be fairly simple for them to do two dozen illustrations. (And yes – I know it is their incredible skill and artistry that makes it possible for them to do “quick” and “simple” yet incredibly powerful illustrations!) But, this is a zero-budget project: for every two books purchased, that yields enough for me to purchase an author-priced copy to donate to hospitals, libraries, school libraries, etc. I knew there was a really slim chance that other artists would be interested in contributing art to my book. (My amazing aunt was gracious enough to illustrate my first one! <3) However, you never get a yes if you don’t ask. So I crossed my fingers and approached the artists, explaining the project and showing them my first book. They seemed at least open to the possibility, so I promised to email and follow up after I got home. I emailed when I got back, and Beatrice said yes to illustrating! I was thrilled. And so “Parker’s Peanut Butter” came to fruition.
Parkers_Peanut_Butter_by_DanaMLewis

As of today, the book is done and available on Amazon here! (Note: that’s an affiliate link, as are the other links to my books from DIYPS.org)

Like my other book, there is no ‘profit’ – I’ve priced it so that every two purchases on Amazon will fund an author-priced copy that I will donate to libraries, etc. (And if you’d like to coordinate directing a donation of 10 or more books in a batch somewhere, let me know!)

The story about the peanut butter and the hot tub is true (which I think is/was hilarious). I combined it, though, with a conversation I had with Parker about celiac from one time when he wanted to know why I wasn’t eating the other pizza on the table.

Like the diabetes devices book, I used simple tools (Microsoft Powerpoint!) to lay out the book and CreateSpace to publish it. (You can read here about the exact process I took to create & publish the book). I hope this inspires others to consider writing & creating more books with characters living with chronic conditions like diabetes, celiac, food allergies, and more to have diverse representation of the challenges we all live with.

PS – if you’re an artist & interested in helping illustrate a future book, please let me know! I’d also love to hear what stories & perspectives you’d love to see in future kids books, if I write more.

Getting ready for #2018ADA (@DanaMLewis) & preparing to encourage photography

We’re a few weeks away from the 78th American Diabetes Scientific Sessions (aka, #2018ADA), and I’m getting excited. Partially because of the research I have the honor of presenting; but also because ADA has made strides to (finally) update their photography policy and allow individual presenters to authorize photography & sharing of their content. Yay!

As a result of preparing to encourage people to take pictures & share any and all content from my presentations, I started putting together my slides for each presentation, including the slide about allowing photography, which I’ll also verbally say at the start of the presentation. Interestingly to me, though, ADA only provided an icon for discouraging photography, saying that if staff notice that icon on any photos, that’s who will be asked to take down photos. I don’t want any confusion (in past years, despite explicit permission, people have been asked to take down photos of my work), so I wanted to include obvious ‘photography is approved’ icons.

And this is what I landed on for a photography encouraged slide, and the footer of all my other slides:

Encouraging photography in my slides Example encouraging use of photography in content slidesEncouraging photography in the footer of my slides

And, if anyone else plans to encourage (allow) photography and would like to use this slide design, you can find my example slide deck here that you are welcome to use: http://bit.ly/2018ADAexampleslides

I used camera and check mark icons which are licensed to be freely used; and I also licensed this slide deck and all content to be freely used by all! I hope it’s helpful.

Where you’ll find me at #2018ADA

And if you’re wondering where and what I’ll be presenting on with these slides…I’ll be sharing new content in a few different times and places!

On Saturday, I’m thrilled there is a full, 2-hour session on DIY-related content, and to get to share the stage with Jason Wittmer, Lorenzo Sandini, and Joyce Lee. That’s 1:45-3:45pm (Eastern), “The Diabetes Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Revolution”, in W415C (Valencia Ballroom). I’ll be discussing some of the data & research in DIY diabetes! A huge thanks to Joshua Miller for championing and moderating this session.

I’m also thrilled that a poster has been accepted on one of the projects from my RWJF grant work, in partnership with Tim Street (as well as Scott Leibrand, and Sayali Phatak who is heading our data science work for Opening Pathways). The embargo lifts on Saturday morning (content will be shared online then), and the poster will be displayed Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. Scott and I will also be present with the poster on Monday during the poster session from 12-1pm.

And last but not least, there is also an oral presentation on Monday evening with a new study on outcomes data from using OpenAPS. I’ll be presenting during the 4:30-6:30pm session (again in W415C (Valencia Ballroom)), likely during the 6-6:15pm slot. I’m thrilled that Scott Swain & Tom Donner, who partnered on this study & work, will also be there to help answer questions about this study!

As we have done in the past (see last year’s poster, for example), we plan to share all of this content online once the embargo lifts, in addition to the in-person presentations and poster discussions.

A huge thanks, as always, goes to the many dozens of people who have contributed to this DIY community in so many ways: development, testing, support, feedback, documentation, data donation, and more! <3