Why Open Humans is an essential part of my work to change the future of healthcare research

I’ve written about Open Humans before; both in terms of how we’re creating Data Commons there for people using Nightscout and DIY closed loops like OpenAPS to donate data for research, as well as building tools to help other researchers on the Open Humans platform. Madeleine Ball asked me to share some more about the background of the community’s work and interactions with Open Humans, along with how it will play into the Opening Pathways grant work, so here it is! This is also posted on the OpenHumans blog. Thanks, Madeleine, and Open Humans!

 

So, what do you like about Open Humans?

Health data is important to individuals, including myself, and I think it’s important that we as a society find ways to allow individuals to be able to chose when and how we share our data. Open Humans makes that very easy, and I love being able to work with the Open Humans team to create tools like the Nightscout Data Transfer uploader tool that further anonymizes data  uploads. As an individual, this makes it easy to upload my own diabetes data (continuous glucose monitoring data, insulin dosing data, food info, and other data) and share it with projects that I trust. As a researcher, and as a partner to other researchers, it makes it easy to build Data Commons projects on Open Humans to leverage data from the DIY artificial pancreas community to further healthcare research overall.

Wait, “artificial pancreas”? What’s that?

I helped build a DIY “artificial pancreas” that is really an “automated insulin delivery system”. That means a small computer & radio device that can get data from an insulin pump & continuous glucose monitor, process the data and decide what needs to be done, and send commands to adjust the insulin dosing that the insulin pump is doing. Read, write, read, rinse, repeat!

I got into this because, as a patient, I rely on my medical equipment. I want my equipment to be better, for me and everyone else. Medical equipment often isn’t perfect. “One size fits all” really doesn’t fit all. In 2013, I built a smarter alarm system for my continuous glucose monitor to make louder alarms. In 2014, with the partnership of others like Ben West who is also a passionate advocate for understanding medical devices, I “closed the loop” and built a hybrid closed loop artificial pancreas system for myself. In early 2015, we open sourced it, launching the OpenAPS movement to make this kind of technology more broadly accessible to those who wanted it.

You must be the only one who’s doing something like this

Actually, no. There are more than 400+ people worldwide using various types of DIY closed loop systems – and that’s a low estimate! It’s neat to live during a time when off the shelf hardware, existing medical devices, and open source software can be paired to improve our lives. There’s also half a dozen (or more) other DIY solutions in the diabetes community, and likely other examples (think 3D-printing prosthetics, etc.) in other types of communities, too. And there should be even more than there are – which is what I’m hoping to work on.

So what exactly is your project that’s being funded?

I created the OpenAPS Data Commons to address a few issues. First, to stop researchers from emailing and asking me for my individual data. I by no means represent all other DIY closed loopers or people with diabetes! Second, the Data Commons approach allows people to donate their data anonymously to research; since it’s anonymized, it is often IRB-exempt. It also makes this data available to people (patient researchers) who aren’t affiliated with an organization and don’t need IRB approval or anything fancy, and just need data to test new algorithm features or investigate theories.

But, not everyone implicitly knows how to do research. Many people learn research skills, but not everyone has the wherewithal and time to do so. Or maybe they don’t want to become a data science expert! For a variety of reasons, that’s why we decided to create an on-call data science and research team, that can provide support around forming research questions and working through the process of scientific discovery, as well as provide data science resources to expedite the research process. This portion of the project does focus on the diabetes community, since we have multiple Data Commons and communities of people donating data for research, as well as dozens of citizen scientists and researchers already in action (with more interested in getting involved).

What else does Open Humans have to do with it?

Since I’ve been administering the Nightscout and OpenAPS Data Commons, I’ve spent a lot of time on the Open Humans site as both a “participant” of research donating my data, as well as a “researcher” who is pulling down and using data for research (and working to get it to other researchers). I’ve been able to work closely with Madeleine and suggest the addition of a few features to make it easier to use for research and downloading large data sets from projects. I’ve also been documenting some tools I’ve created (like a complex json to csv converter; scripts to pull data from multiple OH download files and into a single file for analysis; plus writing up more details about how to work with data files coming from Nightscout into OH), also with the goal of facilitating more researchers to be able to dive in and do research without needing specific tool or technical experience.

It’s also great to work with a platform like Open Humans that allows us to share data or use data for multiple projects simultaneously. There’s no burdensome data collection or study procedures for individuals to be able to contribute to numerous research projects where their data is useful. People consent to share their data with the commons, fill out an optional survey (which will save them from having to repeat basic demographic-type information that every research project is interested in), and are done!

Are you *only* working with the diabetes community?

Not at all. The first part of our project does focus on learning best practices and lessons learned from the DIY diabetes communities, but with an eye toward creating open source toolkit and materials that will be of use to many other patient health communities. My goal is to help as many other patient health communities spark similar #WeAreNotWaiting projects in the areas that are of most use to them, based on their needs.

How can I find out more about this work?
Make sure to read our project announcement blog post if you haven’t already – it’s got some calls to action for people with diabetes; people interested in leading projects in other health communities; as well as other researchers interested in collaborating! Also, follow me on Twitter, for more posts about this work in progress!

Next generation #OpenAPS hardware work in progress – Pi HATs

tl;dr – No, you can’t order one yet, this is coming soon! Yay for new & more hardware options!

Over the years, people have had a lot of awesome ideas on how

to improve the hardware that can be used with DIY closed looping. One such example, Oskar’s work with mmeowlink, led us to later work on smaller computer boards with built-in radio stick, aka the Edison/Explorer Board rig. We started working on that last fall; they were produced and available around November, and the community has been using those widely ever since.

However, like all things, the Edison/Explorer is not without it’s downsides. One of which is – there’s no screen. You historically have needed to plug in cables, or remote login to the rig, or have connectivity via your phone, to see what it’s doing. Sometimes this is more annoying than others.

Patrick Kelly, who has a daughter with T1D and began experimenting with OpenAPS, was one of the folks who wanted a screen on the rig. He suggested the idea, which Scott and I thought was awesome – but we don’t have the expertise to build that kind of hardware. Luckily, Patrick and his dad Jack Kelly, *do* have that expertise! They began exploring some of the options around creating a rig with a screen.

(This is one of my favorite parts of the OpenAPS community, where people bring in various types of expertise and we’re all able to collaborate to make everything from hardware and software and usability improvements!)

And at the same time…the rumors became reality, and we learned that Intel has decided to discontinue the Edison module. SAD PANDA. (Intel, if you’re reading this, please bring it back! We love the Edison!) That expedited the need to find the next generation hardware. Luckily, Patrick and Jack had been progressing on the screen, focusing on incorporating it into a “HAT” (board) for the Raspberry Pi. So after discussion with others in the community about pros/cons and availability about various other computing options other than the Pi, given the widespread availability of different types of Pi’s, we’ve decided to move forward with the Pi and a HAT (board) being the most usable option for the next round of hardware that we’ll be recommending to the community.

What exactly does a Pi HAT look like?

I’m so glad you asked 😉 Here is the Pi HAT with screen on a “Pi Zero W” (which I sometimes type as “Pi0” or “Pi 0”) and a “Pi 3” (pi three), compared to the Edison/Explorer Board. My trusty Chapstick is my unit of measurement, but given some of my international friends claim to not understand that yardstick, I threw in some Euro coins on the right as another measurement stick .;)

OpenAPS_hardware_development_Oct_2017_DanaMLewis
The Pi 0 is flipped on it’s back like a turtle – but the same Pi HAT can be used for the Pi 0 and the Pi 3. The HAT is bigger than the Pi so the radio stick doesn’t get blocked.

It’s the same radio as the Edison-based Explorer block, so same expected range.

What’s the point of the screen?

With a screen, you can easily see the logs of what the loop is doing: Pi_HAT_screen_OpenAPS_example_DanaMLewis

YOU CAN EASILY ADD AN OPEN WIFI NETWORK ON THE GO! (Yea, that all caps was intentional! :)). You can also see which wifi network it is on, check for IP address, etc.

Pi HAT adding wifi exampleWe’re still working on adding to the menus and playing around with what’s possible and what’s worthwhile for displaying on the menus by default.

You can do all kinds of fun stuff – which Scott found out after asking me one day, “what else should we add to the menu?” and I promptly said “a unicorn”. Scott said, “these don’t have emoji’s, though”.

Five minutes later, we have a DIY diabetes/OpenAPS unicorn built in ASCII, because why not? 😉

Pi_HAT_screen_unicorn_closeup_DanaMLewis

Ahem. Back to technical topics.

How is this board/HAT going to be made and when is it going to be available?

Like the Edison-based Explorer, the Pi’s Explorer HAT is an open source hardware design, and ERD (who sold the Explorer for the Edison) will also be doing the Pi HAT.

Timeline is not 100% nailed down yet, but it will probably be another month or so. (Which is about a year after the Edison Explorer was first ready…crazy how time flies in the open source community!) We’ll of course, as always, shout from the rooftops when it’s ready for ordering & experimenting with. We’ll also be updating the OpenAPS docs to reflect the new gear recommended to buy, the steps for getting it up and running, troubleshooting, etc.

What about Edison/Explorer boards? Will that rig type still be supported by OpenAPS? Should I get any more of those?

Yep. Edison/EB will still be supported & widely used. There are some still left.

  • But – if you already have an Edison/EB rig – I would make your next rig purchase a HAT for one of the Pi’s.
  • If you’re new to the OpenAPS community and supply still exists, I’d still consider grabbing the parts for an Edison/Explorer rig – they’re still great, and we’ll continue to use the ones we have for a long time, and will still be supported in documentation. But you’ll likely want a HAT for a Pi rig of some sort, too, to take advantage of the screen & all the features that go with that for ease of use.

What about battery life for the Pi0/Pi3? How fast does it run? AND YOU HAVEN’T ANSWERED ALL OF MY OTHER QUESTIONS?!?!

One of the downsides of our (Scott/my) approach of getting everything to the community as fast as possible – both hardware and software – means that sometimes (every time) we share things that are works in progress. (And we are testing a whole lot of stuff on software, too.) The new hardware is no different. We don’t have all the answers yet, and we’ll hope you’ll help us figure things out as we go! Here’s some of the pending questions we have:

  • Cost. (Pi’s are cheaper than Edison’s. Explorer HATs with screens are slightly more expensive. However, we’re expecting in sum that the HAT+screen rigs with Pi of choice will likely be cheaper than an Edison/Explorer.)
  • Battery life. We know the Pi0 itself is not as efficient as the Edison, so it’ll likely require a bigger battery for the same run time. (No idea exactly how much bigger because I’m not using these rigs in the real world 100% of time yet, because…)
  • Some Pi optimizations still need to be done. (The current code works just fine on a Pi3, but the Pi0 needs some optimization work done. The Pi 0, as you can see from the picture, is smaller, and will likely be the ‘mobile’ rig for many folks, while the Pi 3 might be a backpack/home rig.)
  • Other options for “HATs” that don’t have a screen. (Eric has also been prototyping another Pi HAT, that doesn’t have a screen, and it’ll be great to test and see how that works as a potential option, too. Hop into the openaps/hardware-dev channel to chat with him if you have questions about his approach. )

As we work on the optimizations (great place to dive in if you’re looking for a place to help out!) and updating the scripts and the docs to reflect the Pi suite of options, I’ll begin carrying this kind of rig and doing my usual break-everything-in-the-real-world-and-fix-all-the-things testing approach.

I’m excited. It’s so great to have this kind of collaboration with expertise in so many areas, with everyone centered on the goal of making life with diabetes easier and safer! Shout out to the Kelly family & their colleagues for all the work on the screen & HATs; to Scott for a lot of development work on both hardware and software side; to Morgan & ERD for continuing to be a part of making great open hardware more widely available; and many other people who are working on bits and pieces to make everything possible!

More open innovation coming soon?

This is a big deal: JDRF just announced funding for companies to open up their device protocols, with an explicit mention of projects including OpenAPS.

This is something we’ve been asking companies for over many years, but even the most forward-thinking diabetes device companies are still limiting patients to read-only retrospective access to the patient’s own data. That’s a start, but it isn’t enough.  We need all device makers to take the next step toward full and open interoperability: participating in open-protocol development of pumps and AP systems. If funding from a major organization like JDRF is what will be needed to prioritize this, great: we’re really excited to see them doing so.

Many of us in the diabetes community have chosen to accept the risk of a flawed device, because of the net risk reduction -and quality of life improvements – that come from being able to DIY closed loop. But that doesn’t mean we’re 100% happy with that.

  • We shouldn’t have to bandaid our pumps – literally – with tape.
  • We shouldn’t have to buy them second hand.
  • We should be able to use in-warranty devices that aren’t physically broken.

In order to use our medical devices in the safest and most effective way possible, we need the ability to remotely and safely control our devices – and understand them – as we see fit.  That means the makers of the medical devices we rely on need to openly document the communications protocols their devices use, so that any informed patient, or any company or organization operating on their behalf, can safely interact with the device.

It’s a big deal for JDRF to put resources into helping companies figure out how to do this, and ease liability and regulatory concerns. Thanks to everyone who’s been a vocal advocate in the DIY community; in organizations like JDRF; and individuals advocating at the medical device companies as well.  And props to the FDA, who last month released official guidance encouraging device makers to “design their devices with interoperability as an objective” and “clearly specify the relevant functional, performance, and interface characteristics to the user.”

We all have the same goals – to make life better, and safer, for those of us living with type 1 diabetes. I’m excited to see more efforts like this that further align all of our activities toward these goals.

To the diabetes device companies: we’ve long said we are happy to help if you want to figure out how to do this. Hopefully, you already have ideas about how to do this smartly and safely. But if you need help, let us know – we’re happy to help, because #WeAreNotWaiting and neither should you.

 

How I change pump sites

Last year, I wrote about how I “pre-soak” CGM sensors for better first-day BGs. That’s something I started doing years ago whenever possible.

Similarly, in the last few years, I’ve also changed how I change my pump sites with similar goals of improved outcomes, whenever possible.

What I used to do (i.e. for 12+ years):

  • Pull out pump site
  • Take shower
  • Put in new pump site
  • If the pump site didn’t work, spend all night high, or the next hours high while I debated whether it was just “slow” or if I needed a second new site. Ugh.

What I decided to start doing and have done ever since (unless a site gets pulled out by accident):

  • On day 3 when I decide to change my pump site, I do not take my “old” pump site out before my shower.
  • After my shower, I leave in the old pump site and put the new pump site on. Which means I am wearing TWO pump sites.
  • Put the tubing on the new site etc. as expected. But because I have the old site on, if I start to see BGs creep up, I can do one of two things:
    • 1) Swap tubing back to old site, give a bolus or a prime on the old site, then switch tubing back to new site. (I do this if I think the new site is working but “slow”)
    • 2) Swap tubing back to old site, ditch the new site, and then insert a second “new” site (or wait until the next morning to do so when I feel like it)
  •  Otherwise, if BGs are fine, I pull the “old” site out once I confirm the new site is good to go.

Is this method perfect? Nope. Does it usually help a lot when I have a new site that is kinked or otherwise a dud? Yup.

To me, it’s worth keeping the old site on for a few (or even ~12) hours. I know many people may not like the idea of “wearing two sites”. But it’s not wearing two sites for 3 days. And if you find yourself having a lot of kinked sites – that’s why and when I switched over to this approach.

YDMV, always. But hope this (post-soaking?) of pump sites, like the idea of pre-soaking CGM sensors, is helpful to someone else.